Sunday 26th of March 2017 04:48:00 PM

Nice and Free CSS Templates

This site contains free css templates for your website - Just copy and paste and there you have a stunning website !

Menu und content
dynamic

Menu fixed, content

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

dynamic

Menu und content
dynamic

3 columns all
dynamic

4 columns all
dynamic

Menu floating

Menu fix, Inhalt u.
Head dynamic

3 columns fix
centered

dynamic mit
Head und Footer

fixed BOX centered

dynamic BOX
centered

fixed Box total
centered
BODY element, but this is never the case.) This problem is illustrated in Figure 1-5.

Figure 1-5

Figure 1-5. Older browsers will literally display your style sheets

In order to combat this problem, it is recommended that you enclose your declarations in a comment tag. In the example given here, the beginning of the comment tag appears right after the opening STYLE tag, and the end of the comment appears right before the closing STYLE tag: colors, but they're what we have.

So let's say we want all first-level headings to be maroon. The best declaration would be:

H1 {color: maroon;}

Simple, straightforward, and difficult to forget. It doesn't get much better than that. Here are a few more examples:

H1 {color: gray;}line-height has not changed. It simply has noeffect on the image's inline box, which is in this case30px tall.

Nonetheless, an inline replaced element still has a value forline-height. Why? In order to be able to correctlyposition the element if it's been vertically aligned. Recallthat, percentage values for vertical-align arecalculated with respect to an element's line height. Thus:

silver. All this is demonstrated in
Figure 10-5.

Figure 10-5

Figure 10-5. Selecting adjacent elements

If you wanted to make any element immediately following an H2 silver, then the universal selector comes into play:

H2 + * {color: silver;}

The fact that user agents ignore text between elements can actually be used to your advantage in many circumstances. Take, for example, a