Wednesday 24th of January 2018 03:02:03 AM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 22%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Attention

These pages use certain CSS definitions that are unsupported by older browsers.
more nice and free css templates

TD.home {background: yellow;}

This is a fast, easy way to make a "toolbar" a little more active, without the need for fitting BGCOLOR attributes on to specific table cells.

TIP

By taking this approach, it's possible to take the toolbar and split it into a separate file, and then include that file on every page by means of a server-side include.


css



middle right

#content {
position: absolute;
left: 25%;
width: 50%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
overflow: auto;
}

overflow: auto;

With overflow: auto; With overflow: you can determine how overflowing content should be treated.

Values

visible = The element gets expanded to show the entire content.
hidden  = The content will be cut if it overflows.
scroll  = The browser should offer scroll bars.
auto    = The browser should decide how to render the element. Scroll bars are allowed.

Older browsers do not know support this property.
IE does not support overflow:visible



element.

Figure 8-61

Figure 8-61. Assigning the line-height property to inline elements

It's important to keep these sorts of things in mind whenyou're trying to do things like add borders to an inlineelement. Let's say you want to put 5-pixel borders around anyhyperlink:

A:link {border: 5px solid blue;}

If you don't set a large enough line-height

By being language independent, XML bypasses the requirement to have a standard binary encoding or storage format. Language independence also fosters immense interoperability amongst heterogeneous systems. It is also good for future compatilbilty. For example, if in the future a product needs to be changed in order to deal with a new computing paradigm or network protocol, by keeping XML flowing through the system, addition of a new layer to deal with this change is feasible.

DOM and SAX are open, language-independent set of interfaces

By defining a set of programming language independent interfaces that allow the accessing and mutation of XML documents, the W3C made it easier for programmers to deal with XML. Not only does XML address the need for a standard information encoding and storage format, it also allows programmers a standard way to use that information. SAX is a very low level API, but it is more than what has been available before it. DOM is a higher level API that even provides a default object model for all XML documents (saving time in creating one from scratch if you are using data is document data).

SAX, DOM and XML are very developer friendly because developers are going to decide whether this technology will be adopted by the majority and become a successful effort towards the goal of interoperable, platform, and device independent computing.