Saturday 24th of February 2018 08:27:05 PM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 22%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Attention

These pages use certain CSS definitions that are unsupported by older browsers.
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middle right

#content {
position: absolute;
left: 25%;
width: 50%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
overflow: auto;
}

overflow: auto;

With overflow: auto; With overflow: you can determine how overflowing content should be treated.

Values

visible = The element gets expanded to show the entire content.
hidden  = The content will be cut if it overflows.
scroll  = The browser should offer scroll bars.
auto    = The browser should decide how to render the element. Scroll bars are allowed.

Older browsers do not know support this property.

WARNING

In practice, only browsers released in early 1999 or later correctly handle auto, and not even all of them get it right. Those that do not handle auto margins correctly will behave in inconsistent ways, but the safest bet is to assume that they will set both margins to zero. The browsers that do get this right are Internet Explorer 4.5 and 5 for Macintosh, and Opera 3.6.

IE does not support overflow:visible



padding, as depicted in Figure 8-3.

Figure 8-3

Figure 8-3. Setting the height property for block-level elements

If, on the other hand, the height is less than that needed to display the content:

<P STYLE="height: 3em;">

then the browser is supposed to provide a way to see all content without increasing the height. This could possibly mean adding a scrollbar to the element, as shown in Figure 8-4.