Friday 23rd of June 2017 05:24:18 AM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 22%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

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middle right

#content {
position: absolute;
left: 25%;
width: 50%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
overflow: auto;
}

overflow: auto;

With overflow: auto; With overflow: you can determine how overflowing content should be treated.

Values

visible = The element gets expanded to show the entire content.
hidden  = The content will be cut if it overflows.
scroll  = The browser should offer scroll bars.
auto    = The browser should decide how to render the element. Scroll bars are allowed.

Older browsers do not know support this property.
IE does not support overflow:visible



All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

In your application layer, you can create many interesting Java applications. The apps can run on the server side or client side or both. They may have graphical user interfaces or they may be web based. When I use the word application or app in this chapter, I don't exclude Java applets; I mean application (or app) in the broad sense of the word, i.e., I mean it to describe a software system written in Java that solves a real-world problem.

3 Main categories

Percentage values refer to the width of the parent element.

These propertiesoperate as you'd expect by now. For example, the following tworules will give the same amount of padding:

H1 {padding: 0 0 0 0.25in;}H2 {padding-left: 0.25in;}

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

8.4.4. Inline Replaced Elements

Inline replaced elements, such as images, are subject to a few crucial differences in how inline formatting is

In the first set of markup, a paragraph immediately follows an H2, so it is silver. In the second, the element adjacent to the H2 is a UL, which does not match the rule, and neither does the paragraph right after that. Finally, even though there is text directly after the third H2, it isn't part of an element, so the paragraph right after the text matches the rule and is colored silver. All this is demonstrated in Figure 10-5.

Figure 10-5

Figure 10-5. Selecting adjacent elements