Sunday 26th of March 2017 04:51:13 PM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 22%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Attention

These pages use certain CSS definitions that are unsupported by older browsers.
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css



middle right

#content {
position: absolute;
left: 25%;
width: 50%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
overflow: auto;
}

overflow: auto;

With overflow: auto; With overflow: you can determine how overflowing content should be treated.

Values

visible = The element gets expanded to show the entire content.
hidden  = The content will be cut if it overflows.
scroll  = The browser should offer scroll bars.
auto    = The browser should decide how to render the element. Scroll bars are allowed.

Older browsers do not know support this property.
IE does not support overflow:visible



By defining a set of programming language independent interfaces that allow the accessing and mutation of XML documents, the W3C made it easier for programmers to deal with XML. Not only does XML address the need for a standard information encoding and storage format, it also allows programmers a standard way to use that information. SAX is a very low level API, but it is more than what has been available before it. DOM is a higher level API that even provides a default object model for all XML documents (saving time in creating one from scratch if you are using data is document data).

SAX, DOM and XML are very developer friendly because developers are going to decide whether this technology will be adopted by the majority and become a successful effort towards the goal of interoperable, platform, and device independent computing.

XML is web enabled

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting

In contrast to vertical formatting, horizontal formatting can get a little complicated. Fortunately, it starts out simply enough; it's only when you start putting things together that the situation becomes difficult.

First off, the simplest rule is this: unlike vertical margins, horizontal margins are not the result in Figure 7-38 as follows:

As we can see in Figure 7-41, despite the fact that the border's width was set to be 20px , when the style is set to none, not only does the border's style go away, so does its width! Why?

If you'll remember, the terminology used in the previous section was that a border with a style of none does not exist. Those words were picked carefully because they help shown in Figure 5-27, and the only difference thereis a single point in size.

Figure 5-27

Figure 5-27. Same font, same style, different sizes

There isn't much that can be done about this, unfortunately,save better font handling by operating systems. Usually, the italicand oblique fonts look exactly the same in web browsers.

Still, font-style can be useful. For example, itis a common typographic convention that a block quote should be

8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting

In contrast to vertical formatting, horizontal formatting can get a little complicated. Fortunately, it starts out simply enough; it's only when you start putting things together that the situation becomes difficult.