Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 01:52:39 PM

left

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 2%;
width: 19%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Warning

These pages use certain CSS definitions that are unsupported by older browsers.
more nice and free css templates


css


middleleft

#middleleft {
position: absolute;
left: 22%;
width: 28%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

Calculations in your head

This example requires some calculations. The sum of the widths yields 98%. The distance from the border of body to the first box plus its width plu the distance yields the left position of the next box.

If you want boxes of different width you need to adjust these values accordingly.

Use of this code is encouraged!

Try it with 2 or 3 columns


reason to do so. The following two rules mean exactly the same thing:

*.apple {color: red;}
.apple {color: red;}

However, you should consider this: if you're concerned about older user agents that don't know about CSS2, then *.class (or *#id) is an easy way to fool them. Since both of these are examples of invalid selectors in CSS1, they should be ignored by CSS1-only parsers. If they aren't ignored, then they're likely to cause strange

middleright

#middleright {
position: absolute;
left: 51%;
width: 28%;
top: 106px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

box border

Borders, pading and margin are defined in

#right,#middleright,#middleleft,#left{
border: 1px solid #564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}

Font definitions

Padding are passed to p, h1 and h3.

p,h1, h3, pre {
padding: 5px 15px;
margin: 0px;
}


Introduction

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

However, the exact widths are not defined, so one user agent couldset them to be equivalent to 5px ,3px , and 2px , while anothersets them to be 3px , 2px , and1px . Whatever width the user agent uses for eachkeyword, it will be the same throughout the document, regardless ofthe circumstances. If medium is the same as2px , then a medium-width border will always betwo pixels wide, whether the border surrounds an

Use multiple BR tags, or insert special non-breaking space charactersbetween P tags instead:

 
You can include a BASEFONT tag at the start of your BODY section tospecify the font SIZE, and, for some browsers, font FACE and font COLORfor your page: 
<BASEFONT SIZE="n" FACE="name" COLOR="color">

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

In your application layer, you can create many interesting Java applications. The apps can run on the server side or client side or both. They may have graphical user interfaces or they may be web based. When I use the word application or app in this chapter, I don't exclude Java applets; I mean application (or app) in the broad sense of the word, i.e., I mean it to describe a software system written in Java that solves a real-world problem.