Saturday 21st of October 2017 06:38:06 AM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

#left {
width:175px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
}

CONTENT

All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
color:#564b47;
text-align:center;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
#box {
width:750px;
margin: 0px auto;
padding:0px;
text-align:left;
}
#content {
width:400px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
background-color:#fff;
overflow: auto;
}
#head {
background-color:transparent;
}

to all the problems they could cause. It gets worse, though (or maybebetter), because so far we've been exploring the way thingsshould work according to the specification. Inreality, many web browsers do turn off underlining in child elements,even though they shouldn't really do so. The reason theyviolate the specification is simple enough: author expectations.

P {text-decoration: underline; color: black;}B {color: gray; text-decoration: none;}<P>This paragraph, which is black and has a black underline, also contains
little repetitive:

P {margin: 0.25em 1em 0.25em 1em;}

You don't have to keep typing in pairs of numbers like this, though. Instead of the preceding markup, try this:

P {margin: 0.25em 1em;}
Figure 7-13

Figure 7-13. Value replication pattern

In other words, if there are three values given for margin , the fourth establishes a containing block for its descendant elements. For example, we could absolutely position an element and then absolutely position one of its children, as shown in Figure 9-23.

Figure 9-23

Figure 9-23. Nested absolutely positioned elements

The small box B in the lower-left corner of the element A is a child of A, which is in turn a child of a relatively positioned DIV. B was absolutely positioned, as was element A, using styles like these:

use too many colors, will the user be too overwhelmed? If you changethe default hyperlink colors, will users still be able to figure outwhere your links are? If you set both regular text and hyperlink textto be the same color, for instance, then it will be much harder tospot links -- in fact, almost impossible if the user's linksaren't underlined.

Despite all these issues, the ability to change the colors ofelements is something almost every author will want to use, probablyquite often. Used properly, colors can really strengthen the