Sunday 19th of November 2017 04:42:40 PM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

position of the element are defined by a combination of theproperties height, width,top, right,bottom, and left, plus anymargins, padding, and borders set for the element. Absolutelypositioned elements can have margins, but these margins do notcollapse.

fixed
#left {
width:175px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
}

CONTENT

All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
color:#564b47;
text-align:center;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
#box {
width:750px;
margin: 0px auto;
padding:0px;
text-align:left;
}
#content {
width:400px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
background-color:#fff;
overflow: auto;
}
#head {
background-color:transparent;
}

edge to the right (or left) of its containing block's right (or left) edge.

In other words, a floating element cannot stick out beyond the edge of its containing element, unless it's too wide to fit on its own. This prevents a situation where a succession of floated elements could appear in a horizontal line and far exceed the edges of the containing block. Instead, if a float would stick out of its containing block by appearing next to another one, it is floated down to a point below any previous floats, as illustrated by Figure 8-36 (where the floats start on the next line in

4.1.2.1. Real-world issues

As we saw in the preceding section, a scaling factor is the best way to avoid the kinds of inheritance problems you encounter with length measures for line-height. It would therefore seem that using a number is always preferred. Alas, this is not necessarily so. Internet Explorer 3 will interpret a scaling factor as a pixel value, so you get something like what's shown in Figure 4-29.

Figure 4-29

Figure 4-29. Internet Explorer 3 and line-height factors mean big trouble

tables, which prevent BODY colors from inheriting into table cells:

BODY {color: red;}
TABLE {color: black;}

That's because the combination of your style, and the browser's built-in styles looks like Figure 6-10.

Figure 6-10

Figure 6-10. The result of combining author styles and browser styles

Since there is a color value defined by the