Wednesday 22nd of February 2017 01:53:10 PM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

#left {
width:175px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
}

CONTENT

All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
color:#564b47;
text-align:center;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
#box {
width:750px;
margin: 0px auto;
padding:0px;
text-align:left;
}
#content {
width:400px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
background-color:#fff;
overflow: auto;
}
#head {
background-color:transparent;
}

element's background is visible. For example, look at Figure 7-5, which shows the difference between twoparagraphs without any margins, and the same two paragraphs with somemargins.

Figure 7-5

Figure 7-5. Paragraphs with, and without, margins

The simplest way to set a margin is by using the propertymargin.

margin

P {letter-spacing: 0.25em;}
SMALL {font-size: 50%;}
<P>This spacious paragraph features <SMALL>tiny text which is just
as spacious</SMALL>, even though the author probably wanted the
spacing to be in proportion to the size of the text.</P>
Figure 4-52

Figure 4-52. Inherited letterspacing

The only way to get an effect where the letterspacing is in proportion to the size of the text is to set it explicitly, with the result shown in Figure 4-53:

the image to be raised nine pixels, instead of some other number. Without a value for line-height, it wouldn't be possible to perform percentage-value vertical alignments. The height of the image itself has no relevance when it comes to vertical alignment: the value of line-height is all that matters.