Thursday 22nd of March 2018 04:36:14 PM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

#left {


All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
#box {
margin: 0px auto;
#content {
overflow: auto;
#head {

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

  • XML allows you to easily generate XML documents (that contain your information), since it is so structured.
  • XML parsers allow you to code faster by giving you a parser for your all your XML documents (with and without DTDs).
  • XML documents are easily committed to a persistence layer

    XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

    As you can see, this property accepts any length value or a percentage. That's all. So if you want all H1 elements to have 10 pixels of padding on all sides, it's this easy, as the result shown in Figure 7-56 makes clear:

    H1 {padding: 10px; background-color: silver;}
    Figure 7-56

    Figure 7-56. Padding applied to an H1 element

    On the other hand, we might want H1 elements to have uneven padding and H2 elements to have regular padding, as shown one value. In that case, the single value supplied is taken to be the horizontal value, and the vertical is assumed to be 50%. This is basically the same as with the keywords, where if only one keyword is given, the other is assumed to be center. Thus:

    BODY {background-image: url(bigyinyang.gif);
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position: 33%;}

    The background image is placed one-third of the way across the page, and halfway down it, as depicted in Figure 6-42.visibility is inherited. Thus:

    P.clear {visibility: hidden;}
    P.clear EM {visibility: visible;}

    As for visbility: collapse, this value is used in CSS table rendering, which isn't covered in this book because it wasn't well implemented as the book was being written. According to the CSS2 specification, collapse has the same meaning as hidden if it is used on nontable elements. From a