Sunday 26th of March 2017 04:51:30 PM

MENU left

Menu with fixed width.

#left {
width:175px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
}

CONTENT

All templates are XHTML 1.0 and CSS2/ tableless.
3 columns layout grid. All colums are fixed and centered.
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
color:#564b47;
text-align:center;
margin:0px;
padding:0px;
}
#box {
width:750px;
margin: 0px auto;
padding:0px;
text-align:left;
}
#content {
width:400px;
padding:0px;
float:left;
background-color:#fff;
overflow: auto;
}
#head {
background-color:transparent;
}

XML documents are easily committed to a persistence layer

XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

XML documents are also naturally committed to a database (relational or object) or any other kind of XML document store. There are commercial products available which allow you to save XML documents to an XML storage layer (which is not a database per se), like Datachannel's XStore and ODI's eXcelon. These XML store solutions are quite expensive ($10,000 to $20,000 range).

XML documents are also quite naturally retrieved from a persistence layer (databases, file systems, XML stores). This lends XML to be used in real world applications where the information being used by different parts of a system is the most important thing.

XML is platform independent, textual information

to 255, you can specify one using three hex pairs. If you have a calculator that converts between decimal and hexadecimal, then making the jump should be pretty simple. If not, it might be a little more complicated. (Of course, you could just not use this method, but that would be too easy.)

Once again, we present some color equivalents in Table 3-3.

Table 3-3. Hexadecimal Equivalents for Common Colors