Sunday 19th of November 2017 04:43:04 PM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it'b background color from the body definition. The padding ist defined through the p element.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content dynamic with head and footer.
3 column layout grid. The navigation column are fixed in width, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.

This layout also works with an absolute height template 100% height
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

in valid code we trust (*^_^*) miss monorom

draw theoretical examples by hand than to take screenshots in web browsers and then retouch them in Photoshop.

This is also why this chapter is largely (but not entirely) free of browser warnings and caveats. Rather than drown the explanatory text in side notes, we have chosen to simply describe positioning as it is given by the CSS2 specification and leave things there. Perhaps the second edition of this book will contain more practical advice, but at this time, the only practical advice we can give is this: test your positioning code thoroughly, and be prepared for inconsistencies border-width (discussed in the next section). However, the specification doesn't say whether one of the lines should be thicker than the other, or if they should be the same width, or if the space should be thicker or thinner than the lines. All of these things are left up to the user agent to decide.

All of the borders shown in Figure 7-30 are based on a color of gray, which makes all of the effects easier to see. The look of a border style is always based in some way