Thursday 21st of September 2017 02:05:09 PM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it'b background color from the body definition. The padding ist defined through the p element.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content dynamic with head and footer.
3 column layout grid. The navigation column are fixed in width, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.

This layout also works with an absolute height template 100% height
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

in valid code we trust (*^_^*) miss monorom

complicated. Fortunately, it starts out simply enough; it'sonly when you start putting things together that the situationbecomes difficult.

First off, the simplest rule is this: unlike vertical margins,horizontal margins are notcollapsed. If you somehow manage to have two block-level elementsnext to each other, and each has a margin, the margins will notcollapse. The easiest way to illustrate this principle is to set 900 <SPAN> 700 <STRONG> 400 <B> 300 <STRONG> 200</STRONG></B></STRONG></SPAN>.</P><!-- ...or, to put it another way... --><P>bold <SPAN> bold <STRONG> regular <B> regular<STRONG> regular </STRONG></B></STRONG></SPAN>.</P>

Ignoring the fact that this would be entirely counterintuitive, whatwe see in Figure 5-16 is that the main paragraph

Furthermore, you may find that in some operating systems, a given font that has been declared to be italic may switch from being italic to oblique depending on the actual size of the font. The display of Times on a Macintosh, for example, is as shown in Figure 5-27, and the only difference there is a single point in size.

Figure 5-27

Figure 5-27. Same font, same style, different sizes

There isn't much that can be done about this, unfortunately, to its parent element's content box, which defines its containing block. Without the relative positioning of the parent element, the containing block would be another element. Consider a case where the element being positioned is a child of the BODY element, e.g., a paragraph or heading element. With the right styles, the containing block for the positioned element will be the entire BODY element. Thus, applying the following styles to the BODY and the fifth paragraph in a document would lead to a situation similar to that shown in Figure 9-20:way, except that it causes the user agent to move down the weightscale, instead of up. With a quick modification of the previousexample, we can see this very clearly:

/*   assume only two faces for this example: 'Regular' and 'Bold'   */P {font-weight: 900;}   /* as bold as possible, which will look 'bold' */P SPAN {font-weight: 700;}   /* this will also be bold */STRONG {font-weight: lighter;}   /* lighter than its parent */B {font-weight: lighter;}   /*lighter still */<P>