Friday 18th of August 2017 10:36:40 AM

MENU

#left {
position: absolute;
left: 0px;
width: 190px;
color: #564b47;
margin: 0px;
padding: 0px;
}

This column inherited it'b background color from the body definition. The padding ist defined through the p element.

CONTENT

3 columns / menu fixed, content dynamic with head and footer.
3 column layout grid. The navigation column are fixed in width, the content column is dynamic and adjusts itself to the browser window.

This layout also works with an absolute height template 100% height
more nice and free css templates

html {
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
body {
background-color: #e1ddd9;
font-size: 12px;
font-family: Verdana, Arial, SunSans-Regular, Sans-Serif;
color:#564b47;
padding:0px;
margin:0px;
}
#content {
margin: 0px 190px 0px 190px;
border-left: 2px solid #564b47;
border-right: 2px solid #564b47;
padding: 0px;
background-color: #ffffff;
}

in valid code we trust (*^_^*) miss monorom

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

set for an element, you'll see the background fill the content area and the padding as requested, but a transparent space will incorrectly appear between the two, as shown in Figure 7-62.

Figure 7-62

Figure 7-62. Padding problems in Navigator 4

This may be an interesting effect, but it isn't permissible under the CSS specification, and no other browser will do the same thing, so it's best to avoid this altogether.

Even worse, if you try applying padding to inline elements instylesheet unless that style sheet is selected bythe user.

1.4.2. The STYLE Element

The STYLE element, which is a relatively newelement in HTML, is the most common way to definea style sheet, since it appears in the document itself. general, the height of an element is determined by its content. Thiscan be affected by its width, of course; the skinnier a paragraphbecomes, for example, the taller it has to be in order to contain allof the textual (and other) content.

In CSS, it is possible to set an explicit height on any block-levelelement. If this is done, the resulting behavior is somewhatuncertain. Assume that the specified height is greater than thatneeded to display the content:

12px , nothing is applied to the content-height(since 12 minus 12 equals zero, and half of nothing is nothing), andso the inline box is 12px high. For the boldfacedtext, however, the difference between font-sizeand line-height is 12px . Thisis divided in half to determine the half-leading(6px), and the half-leading is subtracted fromboth the top and bottom of the content-height to arrive at an inlinebox which is, in this case, 12px high. This12-pixel inline box is centered vertically within the content-height